07:45 am, catsgrass
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Do yourself a favor. Learn to code. Here’s how.

boomeyer:

I’ve said this to my non-techie friends countless times. It’s no secret that being able to code makes you a better job applicant, and a better entrepreneur. Hell, one techie taught a homeless man to code and now that man is making his first mobile application.

Learning to code elevates your professional life, and makes you more knowledgeable about the massive changes taking place in the technology sector that are poised to have an immense influence on human life.

(note: yes I realize that 3/5 of those links were Google projects)

But most folks are intimidated by coding. And it does seem intimidating at first. But peel away the obscurity and the difficulty, and you start to learn that coding, at least at its basic level, is a very manageable, learnable skill.

There are a lot of resources out there to teach you. I’ve found a couple to be particularly successful. Here’s my list of resources for learning to code, sorted by difficulty:

Novice

Never written a line of code before? No worries. Just visit one of these fine resources and follow their high-level tutorials. You won’t get into the nitty-gritty, but don’t worry about it for now:

Dash - by General Assembly

CodeAcademy

w3 Tutorials (start at HTML on the left sidebar and work your way down)


Intermediate

Now that you’ve gone through a handful of basic tutorials, it’s time to learn the fundamentals of actual, real-life coding problems. I’ve found these resources to be solid:

Khan Academy

CodeAcademy - Ruby, Python, PHP

Difficult

If you’re here, you’re capable of building things. You know the primitives. You know the logic control statements. You’re ready to start making real stuff take shape. Here are some different types of resources to turn you from someone who knows how to code, into a full-fledged programmer.

Programming problems

Sometimes, the challenges in programming aren’t how to make a language do a task, but just how to do the task in general. Like how to find an item in a very large, sorted list, without checking each element. Here are some resources for those types of problems

Talentbuddy

TopCoder

Web Applications

If you learned Python, Django is an amazing platform for creating quick-and-easy web applications. I’d highly suggest the tutorial - it’s one of the best I’ve ever used, and you have a web app up and running in less than an hour.

Django Tutorial

I’ve never used Rails, but it’s a very popular and powerful framework for creating web applications using Ruby. I’d suggest going through their guide to start getting down-and-dirty with Rails development.

Rails Guide

If you know PHP, there’s an ocean of good stuff out there for you to learn how to make a full-fledged web application. Frameworks do a lot of work for you, and provide quick and easy guides to get up and running. I’d suggest the following:

Cake PHP Book

Symfony 2 - Get Started

Yii PHP - The Comprehensive Guide

Conclusion


If there’s one point I wanted to get across, it’s that it is easier than ever to learn to code. There are resources on every corner of the internet for potential programmers, and the benefits of learning even just the basics are monumental.

If you know of any additional, great resources that aren’t listed here, please feel free to tweet them to me @boomeyer.

Best of luck!


06:58 am, catsgrass
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photoset

instagram:

From Rural Oregon to Brooklyn for Community with @waywardspark

To see more photos and videos from Camille’s life in Philomath, follow @waywardspark on Instagram and visit her blog and Etsy shop.

"Since the year I was born, my parents have maintained an oversized garden and have been vendors at the local farmers market. I was raised free foraging in the raspberry canes and the pea patch," explains Camille Storch (@waywardspark), who lives off-the-grid in rural Oregon. “I grew up in the small town of Philomath and, much to my surprise, I’m still here, living happily in a tiny cabin with my husband, Henry Storch (@hpstorch), and two little kids.”

Camille joined Instagram on a whim to share moments from her life harvesting, preparing, cooking, canning and preserving fruits and vegetables, but soon formed a deep bond with a community of “farmers, food bloggers, adventurers and New Yorkers.” The connection took her across the country to meet one of her favorite Instagrammers. “After months of pining over Nicole Franzen (@nicole_franzen)’s photos of New York City, I decided to take an Instagram-fueled solo trip to Brooklyn last spring,” she says. “This was so totally out of character for me that everyone I knew thought I was a little nuts. I ended up having the time of my life, I met up with no fewer than 12 powerhouse women that I first connected with through Instagram, including @foxfodderfarm, @clamlab, @camillebecerra and @lilystockman.”

For more of Camille’s favorite people to follow from her community of farmers, food bloggers and adventurers, check out these Instagrammers:

Farmers

Food Bloggers

Adventurers


06:11 am, catsgrass
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penteagram:

wooden-toaster:

This is the most upsetting thing I’ve seen

penteagram:

wooden-toaster:

This is the most upsetting thing I’ve seen


05:25 am, catsgrass
reblogged
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picture HD
oessa:

a glacier near Skaftafell, Iceland. +64° 10’ 6.80”, -17° 10’ 15.40”

oessa:

a glacier near Skaftafell, Iceland. +64° 10’ 6.80”, -17° 10’ 15.40”


04:38 am, catsgrass
reblogged
494,056 notes
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saltwaterliving:

what do I do what do I do what do I do what do I do what do I do what do I do what do I do what do I do what do I do what do I do what do I do what do I do what do I do what do I do what do I do what do I do what do I do what do I do what do I do what do I do what do I do what do I do what do I do what do I do

saltwaterliving:

what do I do what do I do what do I do what do I do what do I do what do I do what do I do what do I do what do I do what do I do what do I do what do I do what do I do what do I do what do I do what do I do what do I do what do I do what do I do what do I do what do I do what do I do what do I do what do I do

(Source: vinescope.com)


03:52 am, catsgrass
reblogged
101 notes
picture HD
e1n:

A good boyfriend provides support when his girlfriend tries to take a photo at a strange angle

e1n:

A good boyfriend provides support when his girlfriend tries to take a photo at a strange angle


03:06 am, catsgrass
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65,293 notes

02:20 am, catsgrass
reblogged
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video

saccharinescorpion:

cnuculator:

LOOK AT THE

weird dog


01:42 am, catsgrass
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beingliberal:

Senator Ted Cruz asked - 60,000 people answeredI bet that the Social Media manager of Senator Ted Cruz FB page is now fighting the urge to delete this “Quick Poll” … The damage can’t be undone - the best collection of pro-Obamacare comments online!


01:33 am, catsgrass
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A word about fandom

howlnatural:

stultiloquentia:

ifeelbetterer:

I really do think the biggest problem about show runners, authors, and suchlike responding to fandom—online or otherwise—is that they’re fundamentally misunderstood what fandom is.

They see a group of fans and they assume that they, the author, is like unto a god for these fans and that they can send decrees down to them from on high.

That’s not what fandom is at all.

No one is more critical of art than fandom. No one is more capable of investigating the nuances of expression than fandom—because it’s a vast multitude pooling resources and ideas. Fandom is about correcting the flaws and vices of the original. It’s about protest and rebellion, essentially. Fandom is the voice of a mob that can do better than the original, that often flies in the face of the original, that will accept nothing less than the best the medium (and the human at the helm) is capable of. Fandom is about putting debate and conversation back into an artistic process—-especially if the artist or author in question has become so vain that all criticism falls on deaf ears. (Moffat, I’m looking at you.) Fandom is about mutual creative expression—-there are no gods in fandom and every time someone thinks they’ve become a god of fandom, fandom corrects them again. (Cassandra Clare, I’m looking at you.) Fandom doesn’t need permission and it’s certainly not waiting for it. (Robin Hobb, I’m looking at you.) And fandom doesn’t actually want your attention; often, they’d rather you left them alone to get back to what they’re doing better than you anyway. (Supernatural, I’m looking at you.)

I would bet dollars to donuts that most of the people who run into this post could name five fics off the top of their head that could go head-to-head with canon any day of the week. I could name five fanvids with more biting commentary than a NYTimes review of the same film. I’ve definitely—and this is the easy one—seen hundreds of thousands of better fanart than the promotion materials for a lot of mainstream films and television shows.

Fandom is not worshipping at the alter of canon. Fandom is re-building it because they can do better.

This.  I write fanfic because your show was almost good enough.

I write fanfic because your show was almost good enough.